Greenland of Great Explorers

Ship_Tile_LeBoreal-LAustral-LeSoleal
Le Boreal ✧ L'Austral ✧ Le Soleal
250 Passengers

Discover the unexplored shores of the eastern coast of Greenland following in the footsteps of the great French explorers who pushed the boundaries of polar navigation from the 19th century onwards.  

From Longyearbyen in Spitsbergen, we will head for Jan Mayen island, located on the threshold of the Arctic and North Atlantic Oceans. This isolated and uninhabited volcanic island was a whale hunting center and is home to large bird colonies.  

You will then reach Greenland’s ice-covered east coast and its national park, listed as a Biosphere Reserve by UNESCO. Explore Scoresby Sund, the largest fjord in the world. In this pure and preserved world, you will see abundant wildlife in a landscape of tundra and ice, a real delight for the eyes and for photographers.

Sail along the Blosseville Coast, named after the French captain who explored it in 1833. Here, the ice sheet meets the sea.

Finally, sailing up the west coast of Greenland you will be able to admire the blue-tinged icebergs of Narsaq, then call in at Nuuk, the capital of Greenland, before heading for Kangerlussuaq.

Brief Itinerary

Day 1 Longyearbyen - Embarkation
Day 2 At Sea
Day 3 Jan Mayen Island
Day 4 Isikajia
Day 5 Rodefjord
Day 6 Ittoqqortoormiit
Day 7 Blosseville Coast
Day 8 Ammassalik Island
Day 9 Qingminguartalik / Nansen Harbor
Day 10 Skjoldungen
Day 11 Prins Christian Sund
Day 12 Narsaq
Day 13 Nuuk
Day 14 Evighedsfjorden
Day 15 Kangerlussuaq - Disembarkation

Day 1 — Longyearbyen - Embarkation

Longyearbyen is the capital of the Norwegian Svalbard archipelago, located on Svalbard’s main island, and is the northernmost territorial capital on the planet. With winter temperatures dropping to below 40°C, the landscapes of this mining town are simply breathtaking. The glaciers, the mountains stretching as far as the eye can see and the untouched nature, make you feel like you’re in completely unexplored territory.

Day 2 — At Sea

During your day at sea, make the most of the many services and activities on board. Treat yourself to a moment of relaxation in the spa or stay in shape in the fitness centre. These day without a port of call will also be an opportunity to enjoy the conferences or shows proposed on board, to do some shopping in the boutique or to meet the photographers in their dedicated space. As for lovers of the open sea, they will be able to visit the ship’s upper deck to admire the spectacle of the waves and perhaps be lucky enough to observer marine species. A truly enchanted interlude, combining comfort, rest and entertainment.

Day 3 — Jan Mayen Island

The island of Jan Mayen, belonging to Norway, lies hidden off Greenland’s coastlines, lost between the Arctic Ocean and the North Atlantic Ocean. This small piece of land is inhabited by only a handful of Norwegian meteorologists. Tongues of ice descend from its volcanic summit, which culminates at 7,300 ft. (2,200 m) and is covered with a thick glacial coat. These tongues join the sea, between ranges of black volcanic rocks at times tinged with red. If the sky is clement, you will have the chance to glimpse the summit, decked out in magnificent light. The visit of a small fin whale will perhaps enable you to complete this memorable picture.

Day 4 — Isikajia

To the north of Scoresby Sund fjord, Isikajia perfectly illustrates the impact of global warming in Greenland. Located at the tip of Liverpool Land, this is an unknown area! On maps, at the location looked for, you will most certainly find a peninsula covered with glaciers. The reality is quite different. Today, Isikajia has in fact become an island of alpine relief, completely detached from the continent.

Day 5 — Rodefjord

Rodefjord is a sound located at the end of the huge network of fjords known as Scoresby Sund, near the ice cap. Aboard your Zodiac, set off to discover the iceberg cemetery filled with old blueish ice. It presents a sublime contrast with the red cliffs, a delight for photographers. This fjord, a jewel of Scoresby Sund, promises a moment of absolutely fabulous sailing!

Day 6 — Ittoqqortoormiit

From your ship, the small red, yellow and blue specks become clearer as you get closer. The houses of Ittoqqortoormiit, the most isolated town in Greenland, sport colorful façades, as if they want to stand out better from the ice that blocks access to the place for nine months of the year. Located at the entrance to Scoresby Sund, the widest network of fjords in the world, this village created in 1925 is today home to a little over 400 inhabitants. They survive there thanks to hunting (reindeer, birds, bears, musk oxen, walruses, whales, seals…), fishing and tourism. A port of call reminiscent of the end of the world.

Day 7 — Blosseville Coast

Aboard your ship, follow in the footsteps of Jules Poret de Blosseville, a French explorer and sailor. In 1833, aboard La Lilloise, he set off to discover this isolated and unexplored part of eastern Greenland and gave French names to various sites on the coast. The adventure probably has an unfortunate outcome, since the crew was never found. This uninhabited territory, which now bears his name, lies to the south of Scoresby Sund. Surrounded by ice, icebergs and pieces of pack ice, Blosseville Coast is one of these wild and hard-to-reach places that very few people are lucky enough to explore.

Day 8 — Ammassalik Island

Still almost unknown just a century ago, the east coast of Greenland remains the most authentic and majestic region. Here, the alpine mountains merge intimately with the sea, while the fjords are adorned with high snow-capped peaks and drifting icebergs. Follow in the wake of Captain Jean-Baptiste Charcot’s famous ship, the Pourquoi Pas?, which set off with its crew to discover Ammassalik, a small island of primitive and wild beauty where the Inuit people chose to live. The name of this island is a reference to the capelin, a small flamboyant silver colored fish, whose presence in the thousands announces to inhabitants the return of spring. A surprising discovery in a spectacular setting.

Day 9 — Qingminguartalik / Nansen Harbor

Welcome to this small, sheltered bay on the east coast of Greenland some 200 km south of Tasiilaq, for a date with history and the ice. When your ship calls here, you will have the opportunity to visit the vestiges of ancient peat houses from the Thule civilization. Then, after navigating through the ice, you will reach the departure point of the first ever crossing of the Greenland ice sheet, led in 1888 by Fridtjof Nansen, a great Norwegian polar explorer. This is a magical place where you can climb a gentle slope to reach the ice sheet’s first foothills and get a better idea of just how gigantic it is.

Traveling to Nansen Harbor is the guarantee of a voyage back in time and will enable you to discover a superb bay, into which the ice cap plunges directly. Arriving in these parts, you will immediately understand why Fridtjof Nansen chose this place for his ice cap crossing in August 1888. Indeed, it is particularly easy to access the cap from here and you will certainly be able to follow in some of this great Norwegian explorer’s footsteps. A unique experience, one that will definitely delight the most adventurous among you.

Day 10 — Skjoldungen

Discover Skjoldungen Island on the south-east coast of Greenland. This uninhabited land boasts magnificent landscapes that are sure to dazzle you. The island is surrounded by a stunning fjord, a distinctive feature of which is its double entrance: it forms a bend before joining the sea on the other side. Mountains, glacial valleys, rocky outcrops, tundra and willow forests make up the beautiful scenery which you will be able to admire more closely when you land here. At this port of call, surrounded by wild and pristine nature, it is quite common to see bearded seals, orcas, but also birds such as the common redpoll, the northern wheatear, or the common raven.

Day 11 — Prins Christian Sund

Your ship glides silently towards the Greenland coast, in a setting punctuated by pointed peaks and majestic glaciers… You are on the verge of crossing the Prins Christian Sund, a narrow channel that stretches out and zigzags over some one hundred kilometres between Greenland’s south-east and south-west. Fall under the spell of the primitive beauty of these unique landscapes, including rocky cliffs and waterfalls that are fed by the ice sheet and plunge into the icy waters. Here, bearded seals love to lie on the floating ice to soak up the sunshine. If you are lucky, you may get to witness an aurora borealis, a stunning light show put on by the polar night.

Day 12 — Narsaq

After sailing in the Kangerlluarssuk fjord, discover the town of Narsaq. You will be dazzled by the beauty of the surrounding icebergs − large masses of ice in different shapes and shifting colors. Dominated by lush mountains, this small town is typical of Greenland. It is known for its sheep farming, made possible by the rich, grassy plains to the town’s north. This rather rare activity reflects a past and a technique inherited from the Vikings. Admire the stunning interplay of colors between the multicolored house facades and the glaciers with their myriad shades of blue, and dive into the Scandinavian history of Narsaq by visiting the local museum. A unique experience.

Day 13 — Nuuk

When Erik the Red, the exiled Norse chief, landed on the coast of Nuuk, he found a fertile and welcoming land dotted with fjords. He settled there with a group of his former countrymen, and the Norse remained the principal inhabitants until, over a period of 500 years, their population declined and gave way to the Inuit. Nuuk is situated at the mouth of one of the largest networks of fjords in the world, where the waters never freeze. The town spreads gently out towards the Davis Strait and enjoys an historic center that is particularly rich in national heritage. The vivid reds, blues, greens and yellows of the houses are a lively contrast to the somber waters of Greenland and serve to lift the spirits of the locals during the Winter months.

Day 14 — Evighedsfjorden

Your ship glides slowly along the water towards the west coast of Greenland, to enter Evighedsfjorden, just a few kilometres south of Kangerlussuaq. Evighedsfjorden means “the fjord of Eternity”, and for good reason: just when you think you’ve reached the end of this stretch of sea measuring over 100 kilometres in length, it seems to go on forever, as though to bring even more pleasure to those sailing in it. The spectacular scenery ranges from glaciers to tundra with an abundant flora, and jagged cliffs where numerous bird species have taken up residence. Take the time to observe the white-tailed eagles and the colonies of seagulls and black-legged kittiwakes flying overhead in the area.

Day 15 — Kangerlussuaq - Disembarkation

From 1941 to 1992, the town of Kangerlussuaq in Greenland was home to an American military base. Nowadays, thanks to its international airport, it has become a transit point for travelers seeking adventure in the Far North. Located to the north of the Arctic Circle, this town is the starting point of magnificent discoveries surrounded by unspoiled nature. Indeed, just a few dozen kilometres from there it is possible to get close to the Greenland ice sheet, the largest body of ice in the Northern Hemisphere. From Kangerlussuaq, admire also the superb landscapes of tundra in autumnal colors, where Arctic hares, musk oxen, Arctic foxes, reindeer, falcons and eagles live.

* Itinerary may be subject to change

DeckPlan_Ponant3

   Owner's Suite — Deck 6
485 Sq. Ft. with 100 Sq. Ft. Private Balcony
Twin Beds or 1 King Bed
Includes Butler Service
   Prestige Suite — Deck 6
400 Sq. Ft. with 85 Sq. Ft. Private Balcony
Twin Beds or 1 King Bed. Two toilets, two wardrobes.
Includes Butler Service
   Prestige Suite — Deck 5
400 Sq. Ft. with 85 Sq. Ft. Private Balcony
Twin Beds or 1 King Bed. Two toilets, two wardrobes.
   Deluxe Suite — Deck 6
290 Sq. Ft. with 55 Sq. Ft. Private Balcony
Twin Beds or 1 King Bed.
Includes Butler Service
   Prestige Stateroom — Deck 6
200 Sq. Ft. with 45. Sq. Ft Private Balcony
Twin Beds or 1 King Bed
   Prestige Stateroom — Deck 5
200 Sq. Ft. with 45 Sq. Ft. Private Balcony
Twin Beds or 1 King Bed
   Prestige Stateroom — Deck 4
200 Sq. Ft. with 45 Sq. Ft. Private Balcony
Twin Beds or 1 King Bed
   Deluxe Stateroom — Deck 3
200 Sq. Ft. with 45 Sq. Ft. Private Balcony
Twin Beds or 1 King Bed
   Superior Stateroom — Deck 3
225 Sq. Ft.
Twin Beds or 1 King Bed
Can accommodate 3 persons
  NOTE: Twin beds are NOT available in the following cabin numbers
Deck 6: 609,610,614,615,618,619,622,623,626
Deck 5: 512,515,516,519,520,523,524,527,528,531,535

Cabin_Ponant3